Bowie Community TheatreBowie Community Theatre
Entertaining Since 1966

Art

By Yasmine Reza. Directed by Joe Del Balzo.

art by yasmine reza

Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

Performance Dates

March 16-31, 2012


Synopsis

Are your friendships based on tacit mutual agreements? If so, what happens when one person does something completely different and unexpected? Serge has bought a modern painting for a huge sum of money. Marc hates it and can't believe his friend could possibly want such a work. Yvan attempts, unsuccessfully, to placate both sides. The question is: Are you who you think you are or are you who your friends think you are? The tension and comedy build to an outrageous climax that leaves these three old friends with some very difficult decisions to make.

"Art" received the Moliere Award for Best Play, Best Production, and Best Author; the London Evening Standard award for Best Comedy; and the Tony Award for Best Play. It is a "dazzling and dark comedy"... "remarkably wise, witty and intelligent..."

Cast

Marc
Terry Averill

Terry Averill

Serge
Louis B. Murray

Louis B. Murray

Yvan
Morey Norkin

Morey Norkin

Director's Notes

Friendship. Oh, the troubles. How do we define our friendships and how do we let them define us? Can we know what makes us “friends” with someone? What are the bonds that hold our friendships together? Can we over think them, study them to death? Tonight we find ourselves in the company of three men who have their friendships turned upside down because one of them did something unimaginable. And as they examine their friendships, dissecting them, breaking them down, searching to discover their basic elements, we find that such a study—of what it means to be a friend—is not a science, but an ‘Art.’

I am very proud to be a part in bringing this play to you. At turns funny and serious, dark and light, depressing and uplifting, this is one of my favorite plays. I hope it will be yours too.

Enjoy ‘Art.’


Reviews


Gazette.net preview article of Art

Baltimore Sun Review: Bowie theater finds depth, comedy in simple piece of 'Art'

Bay Weekly Review: Bowie Community Theatre’s Art

Show Biz Radio Review: Bowie Community Theatre Art


Photos




By Edward Taylor. Directed by John Degnan.

murder by misadventure by Edward Taylor

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Performance Dates

January 13-28, 2012


Synopsis

What happens when two writers who have worked together for years start to hate each other? The team has won awards and made money. Harry Kent has saved and invested and now lives with his glamorous wife in a sun-drenched luxury flat high above the Sussex coast, where the play is set. It is a paradise with only one snag-it's built on the site of an Ancient British sacrificial stone where black magic was practiced and now there are strange noises in the night. Paul Riggs has spent his fees on booze and birds, and he lives in dread of bookies' heavies. Harry wants to break the partnership that is Paul's lifeline, but Paul knows a sinister secret from Harry's past. They are therefore locked together in a dance from which murder seems the only escape and they have just plotted the perfect crime for their latest TV film.

Cast

Harold Kent
Jerry Gietka

Jerry Gietka

Paul Riggs
James McDaniel

James McDaniel

Emma Kent
Lesley Miller

Lesley Miller

Inspector Egan
George Tamerlani

George Tamerlani

Director's Notes

In the past, I had always directed shows of my own choosing, and they were invariably comedies and musicals. So when the BCT Board invited me to direct an unfamiliar murder mystery, I immediately found myself outside my comfort zone. I cautiously replied that I would gladly read the play and, if I liked it, would direct it. Opening the script for the first time, I immediately noted that there were only four characters, and one was a police inspector. This was clearly no "Ten Little Indians" with scads of potential suspects. My sharp mathematical mind immediately concluded that, assuming one of the remaining three characters was the victim, the audience had a 50-50 chance of guessing the murderer even before the curtain rose on the first act. What kind of lame mystery is that? Well, my dear audience, I couldn t have been more wrong. The play you are about to see is one long string of convoluted plot twists, which eventually arrives at a very surprising and some might say fitting - conclusion. I hope you enjoy it.

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank the many people who worked through the holiday season and winter colds to bring you this production. In addition to our fine cast and production staff, I am especially grateful to Producer Estelle Miller, Set Designer Dan Lavanga, Stage Manager John Nunemaker, All-Around Helpmate Joanne Bauer, and our phenomenal Bowie Playhouse technical staff, Garrett, Pete, Al, and Walt.



By Tom Ziegler. Directed by Estelle Miller.

Grace and Glorie by Tom Ziegler

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Performance Dates

October 7-22, 2011


Synopsis

Estelle Parsons and Lucie Arnaz starred on Broadway in this charmer set in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Grace, a feisty 90 year old cancer patient, has checked herself out of the hospital and returned to her beloved homestead cottage to die alone. The volunteer hospice worker who appears with the pain medication Grace willfully left behind is a Harvard MBA recently transplanted to this rural backwater from New York. Glorie is tense, unhappy and guilt ridden, her only child having been killed in an auto accident when she was driving. As she attempts to care for and comfort the cantankerous rustic, this sophisticated urbanite gains new perspectives on values and life's highs and lows.

Cast

Grace Stiles
Sandra True

Sandra True

Gloria Whitmore
Jo Black Sullivan

Jo Black Sullivan

Director's Notes

The script, "Grace & Glorie" was brought to my attention by a very dear friend of mine. He said, if you like this and direct it, I will be your stage manager". Well, I read it and I liked it so here we are sharing it with all of you.

I've heard all kinds of comments about this play from people who have read or or have seen it. I have heard, "only old people will like it", "its sappy", "its about someone dying", "its so not today"! Well, none of that is true. Relationships are not old fashion, relationships are here and now and very much "in fashion".

You will meet Grace, a feisty 90 year old, tough, independent and wise. Glorie is a feisty 40 something, tough, independent and not always so wise. You, the audience, are witness to their relationship. You will see their human vulnerabilities unfold and their love for each other as well as their zest for life become real, sharp and wise.

It is our hope that you will leave this theatre feeling you have been part of a very intimate relationship, that you will feel better for it, and you will wish them well.

Enjoy!



By Naomi Iizuka. Directed by Terry Averill.

Language of Angels by Naomi Izuka

Produced by special arrangement with Playscripts, Inc.

Performance Dates

July 22-August 6, 2011


Synopsis

A trio of interwoven ghost stories set in the cave country of rural North Carolina. After a young girl is lost in a cave on the edge of town, there is a Rashomon-like investigation of her disappearance and the fate of those who survive her. To some, the ghosts are guardian angels, to others, a reminder of their guilt. Can we forgive others for the wrongs they've done to us? Can we forgive ourselves for the wrongs we've done to them? With evocative poetry and striking images, Language of Angels is a deeply human story of working-class youth bound by poverty and pushed to the limits of friendship as they deal with grief and loss in their lives.

Cast

Seth
Ben Brunnschweiler

Ben Brunnschweiler

Celie
Shanice Jones

Shanice Jones

JB
Dan Alagna

Dan Alagna

Michael
Chris Schenk

Chris Schenk

Danielle
Kaeti Bradley

Kaeti Bradley

Billy
Justin Truesdale

Justin Truesdale

Kendra
Samantha Alagna

Samantha Alagna

Allison
Bridget Arvidson

Bridget Arvidson

Celie's Shadow
Gary Small

Gary Small

Director's Notes

When I first read LANGUAGE OF ANGELS, it struck me as a well-written and at times hair-raising ghost story whose strength lay in its multiple perspectives surrounding the tragic death of a young girl. The story is at times confusing and intriguing as a result of the intertwining memories of this emotionally stifling event told across decades following the occurrence. It is further complicated because the recollections are from characters who may or may not have died as a result of this childhood experience, and others who have survived, but seem permanently damaged as a result of these events.

Upon closer inspection, I realized that this play is more than a Rashoman-like story. It is, as its title implies, about 'the language of angels'. It is not about the daily life and experience following a tragic death. It is about life lived in the darkness of our minds, in the darkness of the cave we experienced when we were teenagers, a cave that we see the rest of our lives when we close our eyes, lit only by star bursts and points of light and clarity that exist on the backs of our eyelids...

This play is more about seeing in the dark, knowing things, hearing and seeing things that are not experienced in the light of day.  We can not know whether angels travel up and down ladders between heaven and earth as described in the play. But we can wonder why day to day experience never seems to truly illuminate reality regardless of the clarity of daylight. Real truth or understanding exist in the darkness of our minds, where the purest light resides, where stars illuminate the sky our imagination and fuel our search for understanding.

Enjoy the wild ride into unresolved truths that are the language of angels.

Terry



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16500 White Marsh Park Drive
Bowie, MD 20715

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Bowie Community Theatre
P.O. Box 604
Bowie, MD 20718
(301) 805-0219