Bowie Community TheatreBowie Community Theatre
Entertaining Since 1966

By Tennessee Williams. Directed by Craig Allen Mummey.

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

Performance Dates

April 9-24, 2010

Synopsis

Tennessee Williams' drama of great tenderness, charm and beauty is one of the most famous plays of the modern theater. Amanda Wingfield, a remnant of southern gentility, lives in poverty in a St. Louis apartment with her son, who desperately longs to escape his situation, and a daughter, who lives in a world of her tiny glass figurines. Perhaps a mysterious gentleman caller can help the daughter escape her fragile world.

Cast

Amanda Wingfield
Darice Clewell

Darice Clewell

Laura Wingfield
Lenora Spahn

Lenora Spahn

Tom Wingfield
Tim Phelps

Tim Phelps

Jim O'Connor
Ben Brunnschweiler

Ben Brunnschweiler

Director's Notes

Since "The Glass Menagerie" has been long recognized as a masterpiece of American drama, there isn't much more that needs to be said about it from the likes of me. It may be illuminating, however, to read some of Tennessee Williams' own words. In his preface to this script, he says of his style of drama:

Expressionism and all other unconventional techniques in drama have only one valid aim, and that is a closer approach to truth. When a play employs unconventional techniques, it is not, or certainly shouldn't be, trying to escape its responsibility of dealing with reality, or interpreting experience, but is actually or should be attempting to find a closer approach, a more penetrating and vivid expression of things as they are.

Of this particular play, he writes:

"The scene is memory and is therefore nonrealistic. Memory takes a lot of poetic license. It omits some details, others are exaggerated, according to the emotional value of the articles it touches, for memory is seated predominantly in the heart."

These words describe not only our approach to this production, but also provide insight into the way Amanda's mind works, given her preoccupation with the glories and regrets of her past. Williams used poetic license about his own family when they became the inspiration for the Wingfields. It has been suggested that perhaps he was driven by a need to ease his conscience over his inability to help his sister battle mental illness. It is this same driving force that moves Amanda to attempt to "improve" her children. She laments, "I wasn't prepared for what the future brought me," and so she becomes increasingly determined to keep her children from repeating her mistakes, though her methods are clumsy and misguided. Nevertheless, there is a great deal of love in this family - otherwise how could they so readily cause each other such pain, and cause Tom so much guilt later?

An unending cycle of hope, disappointment, and escapism keeps the Wingfields caught in three different time periods: Amanda clings to the past and eyes any progress - cultural, spiritual, scientific - with unvarnished suspicion; Laura timidly hides in the safety of the present so as not to have to face the terrifying unknown of the next moment; and Tom dreams of an exciting future filled with movie-like adventures. Tom must finally act "without pity," Williams notes, in order to break free ... except that he will never truly be free as long as he carries his memories with him. Meanwhile, the Gentleman Caller is the only character in the play that has integrated his past, present and future into a balanced and generally happy life. "I may be disappointed, but I am not discouraged," he says. And that is what makes all the difference ... in this drama, and in life.

Craig Allen Mummey


Awards

Ruby Griffith 2010 Award Winner: Outstanding Achievement in a Play, First Runner Up
WATCH 2010 Nomination: Outstanding Play

Reviews

Bowie Blade Review: BCT's 'Glass Menagerie' shines brightly on stage


Photos




By Gary Ray Stapp. Directed by Joe Del Balzo.

sordid lives by del shores

Produced by special arrangement with Heuer Publishing LLC.

Performance Dates

January 22-February 6, 2010

Synopsis

Benard Muloovy, owner of Maudie's Diner, is served a full plate when his deceased wife enlists the services of an angel to help reunite Benard with their long-lost daughter, Elizabeth. Into Benard's life come two Elizabeths, and Benard's task is to decide which woman is his real daughter, but there's one problem: he doesn't like either of them. Adding to the dilemma: a forgetful waitress, a PhD student, a geriatric duo, a motorcycle mama anxious to become the next Mrs. Muloovy and Darlynn, who has been trying to get Benard to the altar for a quarter of a century. Sides are taken as one young lady reveals a secret and ultimately claims her paternity but not without a twist . . .or two.

Cast

Benard
Mike Dunlop

Mike Dunlop

Bob
Andrew Negri

Andrew Negri

Walter
Philip Young

Philip Young

Maudie
Leah Schwartz

Leah Schwartz

Betsy
Jennifer Harvey

Jennifer Harvey

Michael
Kecia Campbell

Kecia Campbell

Darlynn
Nancy Dall

Nancy Dall

E. L.
Kate Wheeler

Kate Wheeler

Alex
John Mecholsky

John Mecholsky

Daisy
Susana Romero

Susana Romero

Violet
Anne Hull

Anne Hull

Big Earl Ella
Carole Long

Carole Long

Lizzy
Alison Daniels

Alison Daniels

Director's Notes

We are proud to bring this production of Daddy's Girl to you. When I first read this play, I thought, hmmm..... magic. There are magical people and magical places in this world. Daddy's girls are very magical people, aren't they? The cast, crew and production staff of this show are magical people, too. There is absolutely nothing that could keep me from working with any of them again. They are a complete joy and I cannot thank them enough for their dedication to this show, their hard work and talent, and for coming on this journey with me. Now, as far as magical places go, Maudie's Diner is one such place. You'll be in it as soon as the curtain rises. Unfortunately, things haven't been going too well there lately for Benard, the diner's chief cook and bottle washer. Maybe all he needs is a little magic ... and, well, Daddy's Girl. Enjoy.


Reviews

Bowie Blade Review: 'Daddy's Girl' a sweet BCT treat at Bowie Playhouse

Baltimore Sun Review: Quirky characters abound




By Caroline Smith. Directed by Estelle Miller.

Who DUnit? by C. B. Gilford

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Performance Dates

September 25-October 10, 2009


Synopsis

Isobel Lomax and Dolly Biddle are two "mature" rival cable-access cooking show hostesses who have hated each other for 30 years, ever since Stephen's father Larry Biddle dated one and married the other. After an unpleasant confrontation puts them together in front of a live audience, the network decides to give them their own cooking show called "The Kitchen Witches." Dolly's long-suffering TV producer son tries to keep them on track, but it proves to be a losing battle. What ensues are insults and food fights and a secret from their past revealed. You become the studio audience in this dysfunctional cooking show. Winner 2005 Samuel French, Canadian Play Contest.

Cast

Dolly Biddle
Sharon Zelefsky

Sharon Zelefsky

Stephen Biddle
Scott Beadle

Scott Beadle

Isobel Lomax
Debbie Samek

Debbie Samek

Robin the Stage Manager
Patricia Greenwell

Patricia Greenwell

Cameraman
Gary Small

Gary Small

Director's Notes

BCT is proud to be the first community theatre in the area to present The Kitchen Witches to the public. I have been many times blessed by being allowed to direct plays that I truly love. This play, The Kitchen Witches, is no exception. I love these two ladies as I hope you will, too. Bringing them to life has been a joy. This witty play surrounds two women who have deep rooted, complex, and multifaceted connections to each other. The audience is given the opportunity to witness, with great laughter, these connections. We so enjoyed producing this and so enjoy having the opportunity to present it to you. Thank you Janice, and the BCT Board for allowing this new endeavor to flourish. Now, sit back, hold on, you're about to enter the rollercoaster world of DOLLY AND IZZY or is that IZZY AND DOLLY...

Estelle Miller


Reviews

Baltimore Sun Review: Cooking Up Comedy

Bowie Blade Review: Savor BCT's bewitching new show

Show Biz Radio Review: Bowie Community Theatre The Kitchen Witches


Photos




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Bowie, MD 20715

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Bowie Community Theatre
P.O. Box 604
Bowie, MD 20718
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